Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice Course Descriptions

CRMJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3

Serves as a broad overview to the criminal justice field by examining such topics as criminal behavior and law enforcement, the court system and judicial processes, and corrections and rehabilitation.

CRMJ 230 American Law Enforcement
Credit Hours:
3

Discusses the philosophy and history of policing, the different types of police agencies, and the framework in which law enforcement agencies must work, as well as the relationship between police agencies and their communities. Prerequisite: CRMJ 101.

CRMJ 240 Introduction to Research Methods
Credit Hours:
3

This course covers the basics of a cross-section of research methods used in Criminal Justice, Political Science, and the other sciences.  The research methods covered include a basic quantitative method, a qualitative method, and components of conducting a literature review.  Students will learn problem formulation, hypothesis construction, and hypothesis testing.  The course emphasizes the consumption of social science research and research methods skill development to be used in upper level Criminal Justice and Political Science courses.  Cross listed with POLS 240.

CRMJ 250 American Courts
Credit Hours:
3

Focuses on the legal concepts comprising the foundation of the American criminal court process, state and federal court systems, courts of limited and general jurisdiction, the actors within the court system, and the role of the courts on the other members of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRMJ 101.

CRMJ 270 American Corrections
Credit Hours:
3

Uses a sociological perspective to examine the history, institutions, and practice of American corrections; specifically, issues of incarceration, probation, prisoner release, and criminal justice are covered. Prerequisite: CRMJ 101. Cross listed as SOCI 270.

CRMJ 331 Criminal Investigation
Credit Hours:
3

Focuses on the methods of crime scene searches and documentation; physical evidence collection and preservation; information gathering; interviews and interrogations and case preparation. Prerequisites: CRMJ 101 and 230.

CRMJ 340 Organized Crime
Credit Hours:
3

Focuses on illegal organizations (e.g., the Mafia), whose formally organized activities are used to gather money through criminal enterprises and how they impact American society, including the social and economic effect on society, along with law enforcement efforts to minimize that impact.

CRMJ 342 Criminology
Credit Hours:
3

Examines various theories of crime causation, their history and development, and related crime control policies and practices. It also addresses the extent of crime in society, types of crime, and crime measurement issues. Emphasis is on the social context of crime and supportive evidence of various theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: CRMJ 101.

CRMJ 344 Criminal Procedure and Law
Credit Hours:
3

Involves the convergence of law enforcement, courts, legislation, and the Constitution. Students study constitutional rights of individuals and limitations on police authority as interpreted by the courts. Additionally, students study crime definitions and elements of crime as written by legislatures and interpreted by courts. Substantive law of Ohio is emphasized.  Cross-listed as POLS-313

CRMJ 350 Trial Evidence and Techniques
Credit Hours:
3

Examines the nature, use, and admissibility of evidence against the accused in a criminal trial. Students study the Federal Rules of Evidence, including relevance, hearsay, opinion testimony, lay and expert witnesses and authentication, and apply their knowledge through the completion of a mock trial. Prerequisite: CRMJ 250.

CRMJ 360 White-Collar Crime
Credit Hours:
3

Examines the many varieties, definitions, measurements, and classifications of white collar crimes, the damages to individuals and society, and the responses of the criminal justice system, administrative agencies, and criminologists. Students explore crimes against consumers, unsafe products, environmental, medical and computer crime, fraud, and crimes by the government.

CRMJ 372 Juvenile Justice
Credit Hours:
3

Examines the juvenile justice system, including differences between the adult justice system based on values, court decisions and laws. The concepts of delinquency and delinquency control are discussed, as well as the roles of law enforcement, courts, and corrections in the juvenile justice system.

CRMJ 373 Community Corrections and Intermediate Sanctions
Credit Hours:
3

Examines the policies, procedures, practices, and personnel involved in community-based corrections. Alternatives to incarceration are emphasized in their historical, philosophical, social, and legal contexts. Students discuss current issues and trends in this growing area of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRMJ 101.

CRMJ 375 Death Penalty
Credit Hours:
3

Examines legal, empirical, and policy issues related to capital punishment. The course uses judicial decisions, social science research, and case studies to explore historical, philosophical, moral, procedural, and political aspects of capital punishment.

CRMJ 376 Child Maltreatment
Credit Hours:
3

Examines the typologies and complexities of child maltreatment. Students investigate the development of the modern child welfare system as well as risk factors for and consequences of child maltreatment. Different forms of child maltreatment – including physical abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, fetal abuse, and Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome – are examined. Students explore mandated reporting requirements, investigating maltreatment reports, court proceedings, and forensic interviewing of children.

CRMJ 390 Topics in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3

Provides students with a semester-long intensive study of a topic in criminal justice under the supervision of department faculty.

CRMJ 490 Senior Seminar
Credit Hours:
3

Students in this team-taught course complete a mini-research project (individual or team-based depending on the type of research being conducted) for each of the four interrelated topics, and practice multiple ways of conducing research and answering questions.  The unifying theme is the integration of knowledge.  Students approach problems from different disciplinary perspectives, solve them in differentiated ways, and demonstrate how the knowledge they have gained in their major courses can be applied in multiple and diverse settings.  Prerequisite: CRMJ 240 or POLS 240

CRMJ 491 Student/Faculty Collaborative Research in Criminal Justice
Credit Hours:
3

Students work directly with a faculty member on a professional project that will result in a product that engages with the professional community.  The final project/paper will list both the faculty member and the student(s) as co-authors.  Prerequisite: Instructor permission only.

Back to top