Directory Academic Home Home  
WebMail Muskie Link Blackboard  
Academics Home Page
Admissions Home Page
Registrar
About the Science Division
Division Events
Science Week Events
Newsletters
Awards and Scholarships
Student Internships
Student Organizations
Student Research:
Regional Presentations
Alumni Success Stories
Resources and Links
 
Logo The content below is information specific to this academic department's fields of interest.
Geology Alumni Updates Geology Faculty

Geology Students Present Research at Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Week Poster Session:

View All Abstracts

The Science Division held its annual Undergraduate Research and Scholarship Week in April, during which students presented their research findings in poster presentations. Each worked with the faculty at Muskingum, as well as with experts and organizations from outside the campus. Winners of the poster competition were selected by Science Division faculty members.

Geology Department students participating in the Poster Session were:

Anthony Carson, Scott Madison, Caleb Butcher, and Dr. Stephen Van Horn:
SURVEY OF MINE-RELATED SUBSIDENCE IN THE BYESVILLE, OHIO AREA:
POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS OF USING UNDERGROUND MINE FED AQUIFERS

Matthew Konkler and Dr. Stephen Van Horn:
ACCESSING THE IMPACT OF SURFACE MINING IN THE COLLINS FORK
WATERSHED USING THE ROSGEN LEVEL-1 STREAM CLASSIFICATION,
SOUTHEASTERN OHIO

Scott Schumacher and Dr. Stephen Van Horn
USING IHACRES TO MODEL STREAM FLOW IN THE WILLS CREEK WATERSHED

Geology Senior Presents Research at the James A. Bradford Colloquium

Six Muskingum College science division and interdisciplinary students made their research presentations at the annual James Bradford Colloquium on April 20, 2009. The colloquium is a presentation of senior research from the biology, chemistry, geology, physics and engineering, mathematics, computer science and psychology departments, as well as interdisciplinary programs in molecular biology, environmental science, neuroscience and conservation science.

From Geology:

Anthony Carson (Co-authors: Scott Madison, Caleb Butcher, and Dr. Stephen Van Horn) – “Survey of Mine-Related Subsidence in the Byesville, Ohio area: Possible Implications of Using Underground Mine Fed Aquifers”

The city of Byesville, Ohio, recently drilled a water well in the area of the abandoned Ideal coal mine. The well was brought into production during 2006 and takes water from underground mine fed aquifers. Mining related subsidence has been shown to be caused by several factors including shallow depth, weak overburden, geological discontinuities, rainfall amounts, lowering of groundwater, and earthquakes. Subsidence events were surveyed a 3 km area around the Ideal mine to determine the history and frequency of events in this area. A 2007 sinkhole at the edge of the Ideal Mine occurred during an extended period of low stream flow indicating that the lowering of the water table may have caused
this event.

Dr. Eric Law Weighs In On Mysterious "Turtle Rock"

Dr. Eric Law, Muskingum College Associate Professor of Geology, was featured in a May 29 article on the Cincinnati Enquirer’s website. Dr. Law weighed in on a debate regarding a 220-pound sandstone rock that resembles the head of a turtle. Law is confident that someone carved the rock while others believe that the odd boulder was probably shaped by nature.

“The most significant feature is something I interpreted as tool mark. They are shown at a well-protected location and are not easily destroyed by weather or erosion processes,” Law said. Dr. Law plans to present a paper on the turtle rock in this October at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Portland, Oregon. To read the Enquirer story, click here.

Also in the news for 2008-2009...

Dr. David Rodland was hired as Assistant Professor of Geology (he served as Visiting Assistant Professor last year). David published the following research article:
Rodland, D.L., Schone, B.R., Baier, S., Zhang, Z., Dreyer, W., and Page, N.A., 2008, Changes in gape frequency, siphon activity and thermal response in the freshwater bivalves Anodonta cygnea and Margaritifera falcata: Journal of Molluscan Studies.

In addition, Dr. Rodland co-chaired the Exceptional Preservation and Taphononmy Symposium at the October 2008, Houston, USA Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, where he presented, "Using individually dated bivalve and brachiopod shells to reconstruct epibiont colonization and taphonomy over millennial timescales." He also attended the North American Paleotological Convention 2009 in Cincinnati on June 21-26 presenting "Find it and land on it; exploring the relationship between shell size and epibiont colonization."

Elizabeth Bullard is working with Dr. Rodland on articulate brachiopods from Brazil, investigating patterns of shell boring and encrustation and their relationship to shell size and morphology.