Directory Academic Home Home  
WebMail Muskie Link Blackboard  
Downhill
Academics Home Page
Admissions Home Page
Registrar
History Home
Program Mission & Goals
About the Faculty
Course Descriptions
Major/Minor Requirements
History News
Career Opportunities
Muskingum Archives
Phi Alpha Theta
Graduate Studies
Senior Seminar Topics
Academic Guidance
Contact Us
History FB group link
 
Logo The content below is information specific to this academic department's fields of interest.

Career Opportunites -- Past Interships



Amanda Jones


Interning at the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center provided experience in collections management, exhibit preparation and installation, as well as a general sense of the daily activities of a museum. Throughout the two and a half months I was able to assist a variety of positions at the Hayes Center, including the curatorial, archives, library, photography and special events. Under the direction of the Curatorial Associate, Mary Lou Rendon, I was given instruction in collections management, learning the PastPerfect software, which catalogs and accessions artifacts. I was also prepped on the life and history of Rutherford B. Hayes and trained to give guided tours of the museum. Another highlight of the internship included exhibition preparation and installation, including making signs, packing artifacts, and setting up displays. I was involved in updating a few of the permanent exhibits at the museum, and also, installing traveling exhibits. Traveling exhibits included The State of Eight, which was created by the Hayes Center for the Ohio Bicentennial, and installed at the William Howard Taft National Historic Site in July, and also, United We Quilt, the American Quilters Society's dedication to September 11th, which opened at the Hayes Center in August. In addition to the exhibits, much of the internship was spent at the Hayes Home doing inventory on the items and furnishings of the house. The entire internship was a wonderful experience, largely due to the receptive and helpful staff, and the opportunity to personally witness the particulars of museum work.

Nachiket Chanchani

I have engaged in two internships and these have provided me with rare opportunities and significant experiences.

This past summer I participated in the Museum Studies Internship Program at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and worked under the guidance of Dr. Darielle Mason, Curator of Indian and Himalayan Art. My primary project was to understand, organize and safely house the research notes, slides, photographs, awards, and honors bestowed on Dr. Stella Kramrisch, the foremost Indian art historian. The project was a stimulating, challenging and exciting experience in many ways. I began to understand the way in which Dr. Kramrisch approached her material. Besides, it taught me about various archival methods and about the purposes and importance of the visual arts in the religious traditions of South Asia.

In the fall I pursued an internship at the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution. Here I was a John Glenn Fellow working under Dr. Debra Diamond, Assistant Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art. My projects included researching miniature paintings in the Freer collection, assisting with the installation of Himalayas, An Aesthetic Adventure, a major international loan exhibition curated by Pratapaditya Pal, selecting and studying South Asian Sculpture for a rotation of the Permanent Galleries. Concurrently, I attended lessons, seminars and discussions lead by professors, political scientists, senators, senior bureaucrats and lobbyists on various aspects of political decision-making and policy analysis; these were held at The John Glenn Institute for Public Service and Public Policy. These discussions deepened my understanding of the issues facing America in particular and the world at large. They taught me how to draft and to evaluate legislation, its intended purpose and the unforeseen circumstances that often plague it.