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Logo The content below is information specific to this academic department's fields of interest.

Education Department Conceptual Frameworks:

Advanced Teacher Preparation Program
Other School Professional Preparation Program


Shared Values & Beliefs for
Initial Teacher Preparation Program
Educator Preparation Unit

This document serves as the conceptual framework for the Initial Teacher Preparation Programs of the Muskingum University Education Preparation Program. It serves as the foundation for the ongoing development of the Initial Teacher Preparation Program, and as the driving force and the unifying thread across the various licensure areas of the program, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and accountability. In brief, the framework provides the nucleus for distinguishing program completers of the Initial Teacher Preparation Program of Muskingum University Educator Preparation Program from the program completers of like initial teacher preparation programs of other institutions.

At Muskingum University, initial teacher preparation occurs at the undergraduate and graduate levels, preparing candidates for their first license to teach. At Muskingum University, initial teacher preparation includes licensure areas within the Departments of Art, Education, Music, and World Languages.

Furthermore, the Initial Teacher Preparation Program includes students enrolled in the traditional program at Muskingum University, students enrolled in the Muskingum Adult Program (MAP), a program allowing adults to earn a bachelor’s degree by taking courses offered evenings and weekends, and students in the graduate program.

This conceptual framework articulating the shared values and beliefs consists of the following structural elements:
1. mission of the Institution;
2. vision and mission of Initial Teacher Preparation Program;
3. philosophy and purpose of the Initial Teacher Preparation Program;
4. knowledge-bases, including theories, research, the wisdom of practice, and education policies that drive the work of the Initial Teacher Preparation Program;
5. candidate proficiencies related to expected knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions, including proficiencies associated with diversity* and technology, that are aligned with the expectations in professional and state standards; and,
6. a description of the Initial Teacher Preparation Program Quality Assurance System.

MISSION OF THE INSTITUTION
“The mission of Muskingum University is to offer quality academic programs in the liberal arts and sciences in the setting of a residential, coeducational, church-related university and in the context of a caring community where individual fulfillment is encouraged and human dignity is respected. Its primary purpose is to develop – intellectually, spiritually, socially and physically – whole persons, by fostering critical thinking, positive action, ethical sensitivity and spiritual growth, so that they may lead vocationally productive, personally satisfying and socially responsible lives.”

VISION OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
The vision of the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program is to offer a quality educator preparation programs in the context of a caring professional community. Furthermore, and primarily, it is the Program’s vision to develop educators who will serve a diverse* and global society through leadership based on knowledge of human development, discipline-specific content, and pedagogy.

MISSION OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
The mission of the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program is to develop teacher-leaders who encourage, equip, and empower all students.

PHILOSOPHY OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGAM
The philosophy of the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program is grounded in the commitment to help candidates develop intellectually, linguistically, cognitively, ethically, socially, emotionally, and physically.

PURPOSE OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
The purpose of the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program is to support and develop candidates into becoming educators who in turn nurture their students to their fullest potential by (1) encouraging their efforts, increasing motivation, and creating opportunities for developing self-motivation; (2) equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need in order to be successful, professionally and personally; and (3) empowering them to become active participants in their own professions, families, and communities.

KNOWLEDGE-BASES OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
The mission and goals of the Program that are identified above were derived from the knowledge-bases articulated below.

Development
“A thorough understanding of how students learn is essential to quality teaching. Effective teachers must understand the processes and strategies students use to construct knowledge, and use this understanding to create learning activities appropriate for students’ ages, abilities and learning styles. Effective teachers understand the impact of students’ backgrounds and experiences on their learning. They connect instruction to students’ needs, interest, and prior knowledge. They understand the abilities and talents of their students, and use that knowledge to determine appropriate learning activities and identify resources for students that foster rich learning opportunities. Teachers’ sense of efficacy results in their persistence to help all students learn and achieve at high levels” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005)

The Program’s focus on development is grounded in constructivism-the theory that learning takes place when learners add to or revise their own knowledge based on the connections they make between what is already known or believed and the learning activities they experience within a social context.

Individuals learn best when they are both successful and challenged. In developmentally appropriate practice- for learners of all ages and abilities- learning activities are chosen to provide opportunities for success and growth. Developmentally appropriate practice is rooted in cognitive development theory, which states that children move through an ordered set of developmental stages (Piaget, 1954). According to Vygotsky (1978), optimal learning takes place in the “zone of proximal development,” in which learners can function through “scaffolding” by teachers or more accomplished learners at higher level than they are able to function on their own, neither repeating what they already know nor struggling with what they are not yet ready to learn.

Learning take place when individuals connect what they are learning to what they already know. According to Ausubel (1968), the most important factor influencing learning is what the learner already knows. In a constructivist classroom, a teacher begins with what the learner knows, and then provides authentic learning
tasks that allow the learner to alter his view of the world to more nearly match reality by adding new knowledge or rethinking misconceptions (Dewey, 1916: Piaget, 1954; Vygotsky, 1978)

An important way in which teachers connect learning is through curriculum integrations, the bringing together of concepts and skills from different areas to answer guiding questions developed jointly by teacher and students (Jacobs, 1989). Through curriculum integration, learners are given the opportunity to make connections, find patterns, and organize knowledge in meaningful ways (National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1996; National Middle School Association, 1995).

Construction of knowledge is a social endeavor, and collaborative partnerships- from cooperative learning groups in early childhood settings to teacher education advisory boards at the graduate level-increase the ability of a group to define, research, and gather resources to solve problems (Johnson & Johnson, 1984; Slick, 1995). And in working cooperatively in groups, each individual grows a well, expanding his or her abilities to teach and learn, lead and follow.

Candidates promote their own development through study of educational research and active reflection of their own beliefs and actions. Educational research is a powerful resource for improving education (Shulman, 1999). Only by examining teaching and learning in a systematic and thoughtful way can we determine “best practice” for educating our students. And it is not just experience but experience with reflection that promotes development of the candidate as teacher and leader. Reflective teachers are “students of learning,” learning all they can about teaching and monitoring their own performance in order to improve it (Cruikshank, 1987). Through study, reflection, and interaction with colleagues in professional settings, including conferences and workshops, teachers become lifelong learners.

Teacher Leaders
According to Robert K Greenleaf (1991), the way some people serve is to lead. A servant-leader is a servant first. Above all, the leader wants to serve. The effectiveness of the servant-leader is gauged by the answer to these questions: Do those who are served grow as persons? DO they, while being served, become “healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants”? The Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program has adopted this view of leadership as consistent with the Program’s mission and with the regional culture in which candidates work and live.

Early in their professional careers, teachers focus on nurturing the development of the students in their classrooms. As they gain experience and knowledge, they expand their service by becoming mentors, master teachers, department heads, team leaders, curriculum developers, and staff developers. While some continue to serve as teachers, others become administrators. At all levels, Muskingum University educators serve those they lead. This leadership, which is also grounded in theories of development and empowerment, is based on collaboration, participative democracy, and the sharing of power and information (Darling-Hammond, 1998).

Encouraging All Students to Succeed
In order to encourage all students to succeed, teachers must have an in-depth knowledge of learners and the processes of learning and motivation. Candidates need to understand and skillfully use principles of positive reinforcement (Alberto & Troutman, 2003; Skinner, 1953) as they encourage students to reach achievable yet challenging goals. They must be able to recognize how students vary widely in their need for intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation and then develop learning opportunities that address their students’ current motivational needs (Deci & Ryan, 2000). Just as candidates are expected to become more intrinsically motivated as they experience success in the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program, they are also expected to develop the knowledge and skills needed to enable their students to become more intrinsically motivated as they, too, experience academic success. Environments that are positive in both interpersonal relationships and communication increase the chance of that students will learn (Corbett, Wilson, and Williams, 2002).

Finally, to provide personalized encouragement to diverse* students, candidates must understand the varied contexts and cultures in which students live and learn (Golnick & Chinn, 1994). Many candidates and the students they will someday be teaching have been reared in environments where intrinsic motivation, an appreciation for challenge, and an excitement for learning “for learning’s sake” are not valued. They have been reared in environments where punishment is more prevalent than encouragement and material rewards are more valued than social or intrinsic rewards (Payne, 2003). The Program must recognize and appreciate the behaviors and values that have been reinforced during candidates’ early years and work to develop “habits of mind” that are associated with life-long learning. Likewise, candidates must be enabled to recognize the behaviors and attitudes that have been reinforced in their students’ early years and to develop the knowledge and skills needed to enable learners to attribute their success to their efforts (Weiner, 1986) and, over time, develop self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997).

Equipping Candidates with Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions to Help All Students Succeed
Being a subject matter expert is a necessary but insufficient requirement for teaching. Teachers must also possess general pedagogical knowledge, knowledge of the pedagogy specific to the subject matter they teach, and knowledge of the context of education –districts, schools, communities, and students (Grossman, 1990; Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium, 1990; Shulman, 1986, 1987). Having candidates understand how to make a “permeable curriculum,” one which can be accessible to all students is integral to our program (Dyson, 1993). It is particularly important that teachers be accomplished in the pedagogy specific to their particular content area, or pedagogical content knowledge. Grossman (1990) included the following in her description of pedagogical content knowledge: (1) knowledge and beliefs about the purposes of teaching specific content at specific grade levels, (2) knowledge of students’ understanding, misunderstanding, and misconceptions in a particular content area, (3) knowledge of curriculum materials, as well as the scope and sequence of content area, and (4) knowledge of instructional strategies for teaching in a particular content area. When field experiences are coordinated with coursework and carefully supervised and mentored, the gap between campus-based and school-based knowledge is reduced and candidates can apply knowledge to practice resulting in desired praxis (Zeichner, 2009).

Appropriate use of technology, including assistive technology, is an important component of the learning process in both instruction and assessment. Candidates must have the experience to use technology “steeped in effective teaching practices” to promote learning for themselves and for their students. (Instructional Technology Services of Central Ohio, ITSCO, 2016)

Muskingum University candidates must know that assessment is an ongoing process aimed at understanding and improving student learning. Assessment should be both formative and summative and should include multiple measures over time, relying heavily on authentic assessment through products and performances. Assessments are most powerful when they are closely aligned with learning objectives, typified in Ohio by the indicators and benchmarks of the Ohio Academic Content Standards, reliable, and free from sources of bias. Students learn more in environments in which the relationship between learning and assessment is clear and consistent (Crooks, 1988).

Empowering All Student to Succeed
Candidates must be taught to provide the environment for their students that the Program provides for them – one in which individuals are empowered through knowledge, experience, and critical inquiry to make choices, decisions, and actions that are in their own and their families’ best interests. Our commitment to prepare candidates is reflected in the environment we ask candidates to create to reduce educational inequities for all students (Gorski, 2009). These environments include the following: (1) knowledge of education as a social and political process (Freire, 1972); (2) understanding the relationship of culture and behavior (Payne, 2003); (3) the use of “powerful literacy” to make one’s voice heard (Finn, 1999); (4) the recognition of the use of critical inquiry and formal and informal disclosure in spoken and written language; (5) the use of data to inform and persuade (Batelle, 2003); (6) promotion of positive and democratic social interaction between individuals and groups; (7) promotion and modeling of democratic decision-making in classrooms, schools, and districts (Dewey, 1916); and (8) promotion of equity and social justice at all levels and in all organizations through strategies of critical pedagogy which examine the relationships between teachers and students, knowledge and power, language and experience, and student activism and social transformation (Giroux & McLaren, 1996). Candidates that infuse multiple perspectives into the curriculum and engage students in critical thinking and reflection enhance the students’ ability to feel appreciated, challenged, powerful, respected, and validated (Milner, 2010).

All Students
The most important belief underlying the conceptual framework of the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program is the belief that everyone can learn. Each person has the potential to grow – intellectually, ethically, socially, and physically, an students achieve more when their teachers have high expectations for their achievement (Council for Exceptional Children, 1997; Dewey, 1916; Gibson & Ogbu, 1991; National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1996; Association for Middle Level Education, 2016).

Believing this, the Program must provide candidates with learning experiences in the inclusive classrooms that are designed to address diverse* cultures, knowledge, experiences, skills, interests, abilities, disabilities, and learning styles. Diversity* strengthens society (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1995), and teacher must use – indeed, celebrate - the unique background and contribution of each learner to the learning community (Dunn, R., & Dunn, K., 1978; Gardner, H., 1983; Golnick, D. M., & Chinn, P. C., 2002; Tomlinson, 1999; Wood, J. W., 2002).

GOALS AND PROFICIENCIES OF THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
Consistent with the philosophy and purpose described above, the InTASC standards and the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP), the following serve as the goals for the Muskingum University Initial Teacher Preparation Program. These goals provide direction for developing and aligning the curriculum, instruction, field experiences, student teaching, and assessments of candidate performance and for the management and operations of the Program. Candidates for initial teacher preparation shall meet the following goals which align to CAEP Standard 1.1:

1. Learner Development
The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences. (InTASC) The teacher candidate helps students develop cognitively, linguistically, ethically, socially, emotionally, and physically. Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students they teach. (OSTP1)

“A thorough understanding of how students learn is essential to quality teaching. Effective teachers must understand the processes and strategies students use to construct knowledge, and use this understanding to create learning activities appropriate for students’ ages, abilities and learning styles. Effective teachers understand the impact of students’ backgrounds and experiences on their learning. Teachers’ sense of efficacy results in their persistence to help all students learn and achieve at high levels” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).

2. Learning Differences
The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards. (InTASC) Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the student they teach. (OSTP 4)

Effective teachers must have experience in inclusive classrooms that are designed to address diverse* cultures, knowledge, experiences, skills, interests, abilities, disabilities, and learning styles. Diversity* strengthens society (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1995), and teachers must use – indeed, celebrate – the unique background and contribution of each learner to the learning community (Dunn, R., & Dunn, K., 1978; Gardner, H., 1983; Golnick, D. M., & Chinn, P. C., 2002; Tomlinson, 1999; Wood, J. W., 2002).

Effective teachers understand the impact of students’ backgrounds and experiences on their learning. They connect instruction to students’ needs, interests and prior knowledge. They understand the abilities and talents of their students, and use that knowledge to determine appropriate learning activities and identify resources for students that foster rich learning opportunities. The professional imperative of teachers is to maximize student learning and eliminate gaps between students’ potential and their performance.

3. Learning Environments
The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. (InTASC) The teacher candidate creates a learning environment that empowers students by encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, self-motivation, democratic decision-making, equity, and social justice. Teachers create learning environments that promote high levels of learning and achievement for all students (OSTP 5)

“Teachers create a learning environment that promotes high levels of achievements for all students and in which all students feel a responsibility for their own learning. Teachers orchestrate the learning environment to maximize each students’ opportunities to learn. They create a content-rich and reflective learning environment for students. Teachers recognize that students learn in a variety of formal and informal settings. They motivate students by demonstrating enthusiasm for the subject(s) they teach. Teachers create a learning environment where all students feel safe, valued and enjoy a sense of belonging” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005)

4. Content Knowledge
The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content. (InTASC) The teacher knows and understands the content area for which they have instructional responsibility. (OSTP 2)

Effective teachers have a deep knowledge of the content they teach. This content knowledge allows them to effectively sequence content for learning and structured differentiated opportunities for student remediation, reinforcement or acceleration.

“A deep understanding of content is essential for teachers to have the power to positively impact student learning and achievement. Teachers must understand the structures and the history of the content they teach, and recognize that the content is not static but complex and evolving. They connect the content and skills of their disciplines to the Ohio Academic Content Standards and are committed to staying abreast of current research and development within their disciplines.”

5. Application of Content
The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues. (InTASC) Teachers understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline (OSTP 2)

Effective teachers demonstrate a deep and reflective understanding of content specific practices, processes and vocabulary. These teachers make content meaningful, relevant and applicable to students by making connections between the content that they teach and other content areas, real life experiences and career opportunities.

6. Assessment
The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision-making. (InTASC) The teacher understands and uses varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning. (OSTP 3)

“The relationship between instruction and assessment is purposeful, interdependent and recursive. Effective teachers are assessment-literate. They use multiple assessments to learn about their students, to plan and adjust instruction and to evaluate student learning. Teachers have sufficient knowledge and skills in probability and statistics to use a variety of assessment data to plan effectively for all students. Teachers use formal and informal assessment data to determine the incremental development of students based on the Ohio Academic Content Standards. Teachers encourage students to critically examine their own work and foster their students’ ability to become knowledgeable of how they learn. Teachers provide students and parents with formative assessment results and provide them with strategies to improve student learning” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).

7. Planning and Instruction
The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context. (InTASC) The teachers plan and deliver effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual student (OSTP 4).

Effective teachers have high expectations for all students and implements strategies designed to enable all students to achieve. They continually reflect on student outcomes to make appropriate decisions resulting in increased student success.

As John Dewey (1933) said, “Experience plus reflection equals growth”. Likewise, research promotes reflective teaching as an important distinguishing strategy between experienced and novice teachers and is a critical tool for developing teacher knowledge. Reflective teaching practices are supported by national reform efforts and have the potential to affect student achievement (Lowery, 2003). Donald Schön (1983) suggested that the capacity to reflect on action so as to engage in a process of continuous learning is one of the defining characteristics of professional practice. Since teaching is a scholarly, professional activity, its backbone is thorough reflection on ends and means (CETaL, 2011). Through reflection one can assess his/her conclusions, actions and work processes to further his/her professional development (Dewey, 1932, ALPS, 2011) and to impact student learning. And again, to quote Dewey (1933), “…quality educators and education cannot be derived from the imitation of techniques that have worked in the past, but rather teachers should be trained in analyzing and defining principles behind the techniques. In short, it is theorized that the more teacher reflectivity occurs, the better the quality of teaching.”

8. Instructional Strategies
The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways. (InTASC) The teacher plans and delivers effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual student. (OSTP 4)

Effective teachers use a variety of research-based instructional strategies that provide challenging and positive learning experiences for all students. These teachers build ideas and concepts logically to lead students to comprehend more complex concepts and encourage higher order creative and critical thinking skills. They use effective questioning strategies to stimulate thinking. Effective teachers explore, evaluate and integrate learning tools, including technology, to make content comprehensible to students.

9. Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner. (InTASC) Teacher assume responsibility for professional growth, performance and involvement as an individual and as a member of a learning community (OSTP 7)

“Teachers are professionals who must recognize that they are in a unique and powerful position to influence the future of their students. It is imperative that teachers practice the highest standards of integrity, honesty, and fairness. Effective teachers grow and learn, contribute to the profession and engage in continuous professional development.” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).

10. Leadership and Collaboration
The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession. (InTASC) Teacher collaborate and communicate with students, parents, other educators, administrators, and the community to support student learning. (OSTP 6)

“Effective teachers are leaders within the school community and engage in a variety of leadership roles. They ensure student achievement and well-being by participating in decision-making, initiating innovations for school change and fostering ongoing collaboration with colleagues. Teachers serve as change agents in the learning community by thinking and acting critically and addressing concerns related to inequities among students” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).
“Teachers collaborate with their colleagues within the school learning community and in the larger community to share responsibility for the development and learning of all students. Recognizing that they can learn from each other, teachers form learning communities and engage in coaching, mentoring, modeling, and work in teams to develop curriculum and assessments” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).

“Teacher understand the role of communication in their profession and use it to foster active inquiry, and collaborative and supportive interaction in and out of the classroom. They value families as an integral component of teaching and learning. Teachers acknowledge what families have to offer and provide opportunities for them to contribute to the learning community. Teachers demonstrate respect for confidentiality with students and their families and create relationships built on trust” (Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, 2005).

PROFICIENCIES EXPECTED OF ALL CANDIDATES ACROSS THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM
In keeping with the mission, philosophy, purpose, and goals described earlier, the following serves as the proficiencies aligned with the InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards, Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP) and Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) expected of all candidates across the Initial Teacher Preparation Program. These candidate proficiencies, along with the standards of the respective specialized professional associations (SPAs), provide direction for developing and aligning the curriculum, instruction, field experiences, student teaching, and assessments of candidate performance and the management and operations of the Program.

             Standard #1: Learner Development
             The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive,
             linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences. (InTASC) The teacher
             candidate
helps students develop cognitively, linguistically, ethically, socially, emotionally, and physically. Teachers understand student learning
             and development and respect the diversity of the students they teach. (OSTP 1) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

1K1

The teacher candidate is able to identify all aspects of a student’s development-cognitive, linguistic, ethical, social, emotional, and physical and the impact each aspect has on student learning.

1K2

The teacher candidate possesses knowledge of school climate factors that impact student learning.

1K3

The teacher candidate knows the diverse* backgrounds and experiences of the students with whom he or she works.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

1S1

The teacher candidate works cooperatively with teachers, staff, and administrators toward the common goal of helping all students grow and learn.

1S2

The teacher candidates encourages and motivates students to develop intellectually, ethically, socially, and physically according to their individual differences, backgrounds, and experiences.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

1D1

The teacher candidate views all students as having the ability to make decisions and take action to promote their own development.

       Standard #2: Learning Differences
       The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each
       learner to meet high standards. (InTASC) Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students the
       teacher. (OSTP 1) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

2K1

The teacher candidate understands individual differences and diverse cultures and communities in all students to accommodate each learner to meet challenging learning experiences.

2K2

The teacher candidate knows ways to differentiate learning experiences for the individual needs of students.

2K3

The teacher candidate knows about second language acquisition and knows how to incorporate instructional strategies and resources to support language acquisition.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

2S1

The teacher candidate demonstrates respect for cultural, ethic, religious, genders, and ability, physical, and sexual orientation differences of individual students.

2S2

The teacher candidate addresses the individual needs of all students.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

2D1

The teacher candidate views students as unique persons.

2D2

The teacher candidate demonstrates an appreciation for human diversity* including English Language Learners (ELL) and students with exceptionalities.

2D3

The teacher candidate believes that every student can be successful and that it is the teacher’s responsibility to provide differentiated learning opportunities that promote success.

 

        Standard #3: Learning Environments
                The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction,
                active engagements in learning, and self-motivation. (InTASC) The teacher candidate creates a learning environment that empowers
                students by encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, self-motivation, democratic decision-making,
                equity, and social justice. Teachers create learning environments that promote high levels of learning and achievement for all
                students. (OSTP 5) (CAEP 1.1)

      

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

3K1

The teacher candidate knows the environmental factors that contribute to the individual, social, emotional, and physical development of all students.

3K2

The teacher candidate recognizes issues related to the environmental and personal barriers that hinder accessibility and acceptance of individuals with disabilities.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

3S1

The teacher candidate uses room arrangement, grouping patterns, learning resources, and materials to support environmental decisions.

3S2

The teacher candidate creates fair and equitable learning opportunities for all students.

3S3

The teacher candidate is able to create an environment in which students make decisions about their own management and learning.

3S4

The teacher candidate uses technologies and guides learners to apply them in appropriate, safe, and effective ways.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

3D1

The teacher candidate demonstrates fairness and respect in the treatment of students and actively encourages fairness and mutual respect among students.

3D2

The teacher candidate is committed to creating learning environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for all students.

3D3

The teacher candidate values the role that positive classroom and school-wide environment have on the development of students.

3D4

The teacher candidate establishes and maintains rapport with students.


          Standard #4: Content Knowledge
      
           The teacher understands the central concepts, tools inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that
                  make these aspect of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content. (InTASC) The teachers knows and
                  understands the content area for which they have instructional responsibility (OSTP 2) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

4K1

The teacher candidate knows and understands the content knowledge necessary to provide effective instruction for all students.

4K2

The teacher candidate demonstrates general education knowledge and knowledge of the specific content areas for which he or she teaches.

4K3

The teacher candidate demonstrates knowledge of research in the content field for which he or she teaches.

4K4

The teacher candidate understands his or her own frame of reference and potential biases in these frames.

4K5

The teacher candidate understands the relationship of privilege and power and the impact of this dichotomy in the expectations for and relationships with learners and their families.

4K6

The teacher candidate understands common misconceptions in learning the discipline and how to guide learners to accurate conceptual understanding.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

4S1

The teacher candidate uses accurate content knowledge to plan instruction.

4S2

The teacher candidate is able to pass a content area test in the field for which he or she teaches.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

4D1

The teacher candidate expresses respect for the content area for which he or she teaches.

4D2

The teacher candidate encourages students to have positive feelings for the content area for which he or she teaches.

 

 

Standard #5: Application of Content
        The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and
        collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues. (InTASC) Teachers understand and use content specific
        instruction strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline. (OSTP 2) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

5K1

The teacher candidate knows and understands the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to provide effective instruction for all students.

5K2

The teacher candidate understands the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas.

5K3

The teacher candidate understands how to use digital and interactive technologies for efficiently and effectively achieving specific learning goals.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

5S1

The teacher candidate uses accurate content knowledge to plan instruction.

5S2

The teacher candidate uses the pedagogical content knowledge (content-specific instructional strategies) necessary to provide effective instruction for all students including English Language Learners (ELL) and students with exceptionalities.

5S3

The teacher candidate uses research to inform instructional decisions.

5S4

The teacher candidate connects content to relevant life experiences and career opportunities.

5S5

The teacher candidate incorporates multiple perspectives in the discussion of content and connects content to students’ prior knowledge.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

5D1

The teacher candidate understands the obligation to advance their students’ learning through the presentation of content in a variety of ways that are appropriate to different learning situations.

 

Standard #6: Assessment
       The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learners’ progress, and
        to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision-making. (InTASC) The teacher understands and uses varied assessments to inform
        instruction, evaluate and ensure students learning. (OSTP 3) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

6K1

The teacher candidate knows that instruction and assessment are integral components in systematically improving education for all students.

6K2

The teacher candidate is knowledgeable about assessment types, purposes, and resulting data.

6K3

The teacher candidate understands the difference between formative and summative applications of assessment and knows how and when to use each.

6K4

The teacher candidate knows when and how to engage learners in analyzing their own assessment results and in helping to set goals for their own learning.

6K5

The teacher candidate understands how to prepare learners for assessments and how to make accommodations in assessments and testing conditions, especially for learners with disabilities and language learning needs.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

6S1

The teacher candidate uses pre-assessment, formative, and summative assessment regularly.

6S2

The teacher candidate uses assessment data to plan further instruction.

6S3

The teacher candidate actively uses a variety of methods, including data analysis, to reflect on lessons and activities and to analyze the experiences for future lessons and activities.

6S4

The teacher candidate uses a variety of assessments to determine prior learning and plans instruction that connects what is already known to what has yet to be learned.

6S5

The teacher candidate prepares all learners for the demands of particular assessment formats and makes appropriate accommodations in assessments or testing conditions, especially for learners with disabilities and language learning needs.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

6D1

The teacher candidate believes that assessment is integral in improving education for all students.



Standard #7: Planning for Instruction
        The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas,
        curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context. (InTASC) The teacher
        plans and delivers effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual student. (OSTP 4) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

7K1

The teacher candidate possesses knowledge of individual and cultural differences that enables him or her to develop differentiated learning goals, learning activities, and assessments that are appropriate for each student and to make adaptations when additional intervention is needed.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

7S1

The teacher candidate uses information about each student, including individual and cultural differences, to select content and instructional strategies to meet the cognitive, linguistic, ethical, social, emotional and physical needs of all students.

7S2

The teacher candidate uses the knowledge of student academic backgrounds to choose and manage ideas, select materials, and analyze ways to present content.

7S3

The teacher candidate aligns his/her instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities and Ohio Learning Standards.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

7D1

The teacher candidate believes that rigorous planning supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.


Standard #8: Instructional Strategies

       The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas
       and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways. (InTASC) The teacher plans and delivers effective
       instruction that advances the learning of each individual student. (OSTP 4) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

8K1

The teacher candidate is knowledgeable about a variety of instructional strategies including technology to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

8K2

The teacher candidate understands how to design an effective lesson.

8K3

The teacher candidate knows several ways to communicate effectively to students.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

8S1

The teacher candidate communicates clear learning goals.

8S2

The teacher candidate explicitly links learning activities to defined learning goals.

8S3

The teacher candidate uses resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning.

8S4

The teacher candidate uses a variety of instructional strategies to reach all learners.

8S5

The teacher candidate values reflection as a strategy for improving student learning.

8S6

The teacher candidate motivates, challenges, and encourages every student to be successful by addressing individual differences through differentiated learning goals, teaching methods, student activities, and resources.

8S7

The teacher candidate adapts written and oral communications to appropriate situations, including modeling formal stand English in the classroom.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

8D1

The teacher candidate respects varied verbal and non-verbal communication which reflects a student’s cultural and individual background.

8D2

The teacher candidate models Standard Formal English in speaking and writing to build standard communication skills to enrich the opportunities for learners.


Standard #9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice

       The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of
        his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of
        each learner. (InTASC) Teachers assume responsibility for professional growth, performance and involvement as an individual
        and as a member of a learning community. (OSTP 7) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

9K1

The teacher candidate knows a variety of meaningful methods for improving his or her performance including research, literature, conferences, seminars, in-services, and interactions with colleagues, parents, and students.

9K2

The teacher candidate understands how to use evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and action on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

9S1

The teacher candidate uses a variety of meaningful methods to reflect on, assess, and implement improvement plans individually and in collaboration with others.

9S2

The teacher candidate uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

9S3

The teacher candidate demonstrates a sense of efficacy through the methods and time used to ensure learners successfully achieve learning goals.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

9D1

The teacher candidate projects a professional attitude.

9D2

The teacher candidate projects a professional appearance.

9D3

The teacher candidate projects professional behavior.

9D4

The teacher candidate understands the role of a teacher is to act as a change agent to promote more equitable opportunities for learners and to advocate for students.


Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration
       The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners,
       families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession. (InTASC)
       Teachers collaborate and communicate with students, parents, other educators, administrators, and the community to support
       student learning. (OSTP 6) (CAEP 1.1)

Knowledge

Equip, Encourage, Empower

10K1

The teacher candidate knows a variety of ways in which teacher-leadership skills may be demonstrated in the classroom.

10K2

The teacher candidate knows how to engage all stakeholders in the learning process.

10K3

The teacher candidate knows a variety of methods for learning about the families and communities of the students with whom he or she works.

10K4

The teacher candidate possesses knowledge of communication and collaboration skills needed to work in an encouraging environment.

Skills

Equip, Encourage, Empower

10S1

The teacher candidate demonstrates teacher-leadership skills appropriate to his or her teaching assignment.

10S2

The teacher candidate is willing to assume leadership roles.

10S3

The teacher candidate uses information about students’ families and communities to create experiences that inspire a sense of belonging and support.

Dispositions

Equip, Encourage, Empower

10D1

The teacher candidate views leadership as a way to serve others and in doing so promotes equity and social justice.

10D2

The teacher candidate appreciates the role of families and communities in student learning.

10D3

The teacher candidate recognizes the power of working cooperatively and collaboratively with other teachers, staff, and administrators.


ASSESSMENT SYSTEM FOR THE INITIAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM

The assessment system for the Initial Teacher Preparation Program is designed to collect, summarize, and analyze data regarding (1) candidate performance, (2) program completer performance, and (3) management and operations of the Program. Results are then used to evaluate, make decisions concerning, and improve the performances of the Program’s candidates and the Program. The Quality Assurance System Policy (QAS), as approved by the Education Department faculty, drives the implementation of the assessment system.

Quality Assurance System Policy
It is the responsibility of the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department, in collaboration with the faculty and staff of the Department, to provide leadership for the maintenance of a Quality Assurance System (QAS). The System is to be comprised of valid and reliable data gathered from multiple sources that are used for sustained and evidence-based continuous improvement of EPP programs, curriculum, assessments, and operations for the purpose of assuring candidate and program completer effectiveness to impact P-12 student learning and development.

Data to be Collected, Determined, and/or Updated

Regular and comprehensive data to be gathered and maintained within the QAS include:

#

Data to be Collected, Determined, and/or Updated

Where Data Comes From

Collected

Standard Placement

1

Applicant qualification for admission into educator preparation*

Ed Department Meetings Application Approval

Each Semester

3.1, 3.2

2

Performance of candidates on candidate proficiencies and impact on student learning

Key Program Assessments & Key Licensure Assessments

Each Semester /Term

1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, & 3.6 and SPA & ODHE standards

3

Student teacher satisfaction with program operations

Student Teacher Completer Survey

Each Semester / Term

5.1

4

P-12 student satisfaction with student teachers

P-12 Survey (EC, MS, HS)

Each Semester / Term

4.2

5

Program completer satisfaction with preparation program and program operations**

Alumni Completer Survey

Annually

5.1

6

Program completer impact on P-12 student learning

Value added data

Annually

1.2, 4.4

7

P-12 student satisfaction with program completers

P-12 Survey (EC, MS, HS)

Annually

4.2

8

Employer satisfaction with program completers***

Employer Satisfaction Survey

Annually

4.3

9

Candidate completion rate of preparation program

Comparison of those admitted with program completers as based on Title II

Annually

CAEP Annual Report

10

Candidate rate of licensure acquisition

Comparison of program completers as based on Title II with those who obtained licensure

Annually

CAEP Annual Report

11

Program completer employment status by academic year

Employment Survey

September 15 Annually

CAEP Annual Report

12

Official Key Program Assessments

Reviewed as needed

1.1

13

Official Key Licensure Assessments

Reviewed as needed

14

Official licensure alignments with Ohio Learning Standards

Reviewed as needed

ODHE

15

Official course syllabi that include alignments with respective standards

Updated Annually

ODHE

16

Annual Data Reports

Annually

17

Follow-Up reports to annual Data Retreats

Annually

18

Official accreditation and program approval documents

As granted/ approved

*Data regarding (1) gender (M / F), (2) licensure area, (3) program level (baccalaureate / post-baccalaureate), (4) county of residence (Appalachian / Non-Appalachian), (5) race (white / non-white), and (6) ethnicity (Hispanic / Latino / non-Hispanic/Latino) are to be collected for each applicant applying for admission to a program.

**Data regarding (1) gender (M / F), (2) licensure area, (3) program level (baccalaureate / post-baccalaureate), (4) semester of program completion, (5) years of teaching experience (first year / second year / third year), and (6) race (white / non-white) are to be collected from each program completer to whom the Alumni Satisfaction Survey is sent.

***Data regarding school level (primary / intermediate / elementary / middle school / junior high school / high school) is to be collected from each principal to whom the Employer Satisfaction Survey is sent. Data collected are to be aligned as called for within CAEP standards, Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards, Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) standards, national and state specialized professional association (SPA) standards, and the statement of beliefs and values of the EPP.

B. Procedures for Data Collection
The Educator Preparation Assessment Specialist (EPAS), under the supervision of the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department, is responsible for overseeing the collection of data outlined in Section A above. The EPAS is responsible for (1) informing relevant individuals at the beginning of each semester/term about the need for the respective assessments, surveys, and other data sources to be completed and gathered prior to and or at the conclusion of each semester/term; (2) making assessments and surveys available to the respective populations for completion; and (3) monitoring the collection of the expected data for each semester/term.

C. Compilation of Data
At the conclusion of each semester/term, the EPAS is charged with entering the data collected into the data technology system(s) identified for maintaining the EPP’s QAS. Furthermore, it is noted that data must be compiled in a format that allows for acceptable analysis of the data as called for in CAEP, ODHE, and SPA report guidelines.

D. Immediate Use of Data following Compilation
Upon the compilation of individual candidate data from key program and key licensure assessments, individual candidate data are to be compared with expected levels of candidate performances. When expected levels of performance have not been met, the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department, in collaboration with faculty advisors and/or the education instructor of record, is to develop with the respective candidate an Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP). The plan is to be designed to guide respective candidates in meeting the required proficiency levels prior to registering for any additional professional education course work or prior to achieving program completer status.

E. Aggregation and Disaggregation of Data
Data collected are to be aggregated for each entire assessment cohort and for each survey cohort.
Additionally, data collected are to be disaggregated as follows:

Key Program Assessments
(1) gender (M / F)
(2) licensure area
(3) program level (baccalaureate / post-baccalaureate)
(4) county of residence (Appalachian / Non-Appalachian)
(5) race (white / non-white)
(6) ethnicity (Hispanic / Latino / non-Hispanic/Latino)

 Alumni Satisfaction Survey
(1) gender (M / F)
(2) licensure area
(3) program level (baccalaureate / post-baccalaureate)
(4) semester of program completion
(5) years of teaching experience (first year / second year / third year)
(6) race (white / non-white)

 Employer Satisfaction Survey
(1) school level (primary / intermediate / elementary / middle school / junior high school / high school)

F. Statistical Analysis of Data
Each key program assessment, key licensure assessment, and survey is to be statistically analyzed for each item of the respective assessment and survey. Each analysis is to include the following statistical information for each item:
(1) population size
(2) mean
(3) range
(4) percentage of respondents at each level of a scoring guide or survey for an item
(5) standard deviation

G. Data Reports
Upon the compilation and statistical analysis of the gathered data, the EPAS is responsible for generating a Data Report for fall semester (including summer term data) and a Data Report for spring semester. Data Reports are to include the statistical analysis of the aggregated data for each assessment/survey cohort and the statistical analysis of the disaggregated data of each assessment/survey cohort (see Section E and F above).

H. Dissemination of Data Reports
Upon completion of each Data Report noted above, the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department is charged with disseminating the Report to the President of the University, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Studies, Division Chairs, full-time and adjunct faculty of the Education Department, and members of the Educator Preparation Advisory Team (EPAT) and Muskingum Education Student Advisory Group (MESAG).

I. Analysis of Data Reports
Following the dissemination of the respective Data Reports, the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department is charged with planning and carrying out an Annual Data Retreat to be held no later than September 1 of each academic year for the purpose of conducting an analysis of the fall and spring Data Reports of the previous academic year. Individuals noted in Section H above, in addition to other internal and external stakeholders whose involvement is pertinent to the work of the EPP, are to be encouraged to engage in the Data Retreat. While the Data Reports are to be the foci of the Data Retreats, each Retreat is to also include a review of the coherency and effectiveness of the QAS.
The intended outcome of the Annual Data Retreat is a set of recommendations to be further reviewed by the faculty of the Education Department and acted upon following the procedures articulated in the governance documents of the University. Said recommendations are to serve as foundations for the EPP’s engagement in long- and short-term strategic thinking and planning regarding the role of the EPP within the Institution.

J. Follow-Up Report
By the conclusion of the first semester of each academic year, the Director of Educator Preparation/Chair of the Education Department is charged with generating a Follow-Up Report that describes the actions taken on the recommendations set forth at the Annual Data Retreat. Said Report is to be disseminated to the President of the University, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Studies, Division Chairs, full and part-time faculty of the Education Department, members of EPAT and MESAG, and other stakeholders who attended the Annual Data Retreat.

Assessment of Candidate Performance
The assessment system is designed to assess candidate performance on candidate proficiencies articulated in the MU Shared Values and Beliefs across the Gateways for the Initial Teacher Preparation Program. The gateway stages are: Pre-Candidacy Course and Field Work, Initial Teacher Licensure Candidacy, Registration for Clinical Practice, and Exit from Initial Teacher Preparation Program.

The chart below details the nine key program assessments. The chart includes the gateways, Key Program assessments, candidate proficiencies assessed, course(s) in which each assessment is administered, and assessor.

Gateway

Key Program Assessment

Candidate Proficiency Assessed

Course in which Assessment is Administered

Assessor

1

KP#1 Level I: Professional Dispositions

2D2, 2D3, 3D2, 3D3, 7D1, 8D2, 9D1, 9D2, 9D3, 9D4, 10D3, 1D2

EDUC 112 /

EDUC 500

Course instructor

2

KP#1 Level II: Professional Dispositions

2D2, 2D3, 3D2, 3D3, 7D1, 8D2, 9D1, 9D2, 9D3, 9D4, 10D3, 1D1, 3D1, 4D1, 4D2, 5D1, 6D1, 10D2, 1D2

Content Methods Courses

Cooperating teacher

2

KP#1 Level III: Professional Dispositions

2D2, 2D3, 3D2, 3D3, 7D1, 8D2, 9D1, 9D2, 9D3, 9D4, 10D3, 1D1, 3D1, 4D1, 4D2, 5D1, 6D1, 10D2, 1D2

Student Teaching/Portfolio Courses

Cooperating teacher

2

KP#2 Level I: Ability to Plan Lessons/Effect on Student Learning

7S3, 8S1, 6S1, 7S2, 6S4, 6S2, 6S3, 6S2, 2K1, 4S1, 2K2, 1S2, 2S2, 2S1, 2K2, 4K1, 5K1, 5K2, 8S3, 3S1, 7S4, 5S5, 5S5, 8S2, 8S4, 8S6, 2K1, 3K2, 6K2, 6K1, 6K3, 6S5, 6K4, 9K2, 9S2, 9D4, 2D3, 3D3, 3D2

General Methods Courses

Course instructor

2

KP#2 Level II: Ability to Plan Lessons/Effect on Student Learning

7S3, 8S1, 6S1, 7S2, 6S4, 6S3, 6S2, 2K1, 4S1, 1S2, 2S2, 2S1, 2K2, 4K1, 5K1, 5K2, 8S3, 3S1, 7S4, 5S2, 5S5, 5S4, 8S2, 8S4, 8S6, 2K1, 3K2, 3K2, 6K2, 6K1, 6K3, 6S5, 6K4, 9K2, 9S2, 9D4, 2D3, 3D3, 3D4

Content Methods Courses

Course instructor

3

KP#2 Level III: Ability to Plan Lessons/Effect on Student Learning

7S3, 8S1, 6S1, 7S2, 6S4, 6S3, 6S2, 2K1, 4S1, 1S2, 2S2, 2S1, 2K2, 4K1, 5K1, 5K2, 8S3, 3S1, 7S4, 5S2, 5S5, 5S4, 8S2, 8S4, 8S6, 2K1, 3K2, 6K2, 6K1, 6K3, 6S5, 6K4, 9K2, 9S2, 9D4, 2D3, 3D3, 10S1, 9D3

Student Teaching/Portfolio Courses

Portfolio Assessor

2

KP#3: Pre-Student Teaching

7S3, 1K1, 2S2, 4K1, 4K2, 4K3, 5K2, 2S1, 5K1, 5S1, 8S1, 7S1, 8S4, 8S2, 9S3, 8S2, 5S4, 6K2, 2K1, 2D3, 8S3, 3K1, 8S6, 3S2, 3S3, 8S7, 9D1, 9D3, 9K1, 9S3, 10D3

Content Methods Courses

Cooperating teacher

3

KP#4: Environmental and Behavioral Support Project

1K1, 1K2, 1K3, 2S1, 3S3, 3D1, 3S1, 3S2, 10K4, 4K6, 9S2, 10S3, 10S1, 19D4

Student Teaching/Portfolio Courses

Portfolio Assessor

3

KP#5: Student Teaching

1S1, 1D1, 2S2, 5S2, 2S1, 3S1, 3S3, 3D1, 3D2, 3S4, 7S1, 4S1, 5S1, 5S3, 4D1, 4D2, 4K2, 4K3, 4K7, 7S2, 5S4, 5D1, 5S5, 5K2, 8S4, 8S6, 6S3, 6S1, 6S2, 6S4, 6S6, 7S3, 6D1, 7K1, 8S3, 7S2, 10D3, 9S1, 10S3, 8S2, 8S4, 8S7, 8K1, 8D1, 8D2, 9S1, 9S2, 9D1, 9D3, 3S2, 9D4, 10K3, 3K2

Student Teaching Courses

University Supervisor

Note: Expanded CAEP Definition of *Diversity/Diverse

Candidate diversity is defined as a collection of individual attributes such as national origin, language, racial identity, color, disability, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, Appalachian cultural region, geographic region, political affiliation, religion, socioeconomic background, veteran status, and family structure and educational background. The definition also encompasses differences among people concerning where they are from, where they have lived, their differences of thought and life experiences, and their personalities, interests, and learning modalities.
*The above is a refinement of the definition of diversity provided by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Office of Diversity and Inclusion (2011).

Note: The term “all students” includes all individuals with respect to ethnicity; race; socioeconomic status; gender; exceptionalities; language, including English Language Learners (ELL); religion; sexual orientation; and geographic area, including Appalachian.



9/2/16